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's not what we need in terms of someone that's going to lead our foreign policy. it's not politics. 'not partisan. it's about protecting our country. >> all eyes on washington. let's see if anything gets done in the next couple of weeks. thank you so much, we appreciate your both being here today. >> thanks, have a great day. >> you, too. >>> the daytona 500 just a week away. what driver danica patrick is doing today that could give you a critical advantage in the race and land her in the nascar history books. it's gonna be 30 minutes. oh, so that means that we won't be stuck up here, for hours, with nothing to do. oh i get it, you wanna pass the time, huh. (holds up phone) fruit ninja!!! emergency roadside assistance. just a click away with the geico mobile app. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ] nothing gets you going quite like the power of quaker oats. today is going to be epic. quaker up. then you're going to love this. right now they're only $14.95! wow-a grt deal just got a whole lot better. hurry. $14.95 won't last. to deposit checks from anywhere. [ wind howling ] easier than
. john, what do you think? >> he will talk about foreign policy. forbes policy will not be the thrust of the speech. jobs, the economy will be. but when he talks about foreign policy, it's a pretty safe bet north korea will be on his mind. the president set to give that address at 9:00 eastern time. reports indicate that he may do a little bit more finger pointing this time than reaching across the aisle. congressman adam kinzinger, a republican from ill. thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> we're getting previews about how the president may sound tonig, glen thrush of politico says don't expect anything like the call for peaceful collaboration that addressed the joint congress in 2009. >> month of the same. i think this is an opportunity. the president has an amazing opportunity to call republicans and democrats together to say both sides have to accept things they don't want in order to accept the problems in the country and for future generations. that's what's missing, the discussion of what happens next with the next generation of americans and, unfortunately,
editor for foreign policy magazine. a lot of sources in the pentagon and he just wrote this about chuck hagel, quote, his big problem is that tho one much wants him running the pentagon. the prospect is a real problem now because the next secretary of defense will need to work with congress to reduce the defense budget and work with the military to reshape it to make it relevant for future conflict. at the moment, he appears to lack the political capital and the intellect yul appetite to do the latter. do you think chuck hagel can run the pentagon? >> my inclination has been to give the president the prerogative of deciding who's in his cabinet. i voted for john kerry although i don't agree with much he represents as far as a u.s. senator, but i think he's an honest person and i think the president has the right to decide. with regard to hagel, my first inclination was to give him the benefit of the doubt. i'm for auditing the pentagon. i think there is waste to be found. he's a soldier. served honor bly. i'm starting to have doubts and they are that if you going to run department of de
the arab spring. what are you listening for tonight when it comes to foreign policy? >> well, in foreign policy i think the point jake has made and broken is probably the most important one. i doubt very much you'll hear much about north korea. there will be a condemnation, i imagine. we've been through this, watched this dance before. new leader comes into north korea, needs to show his stuff, needs to consolidate the -- his support with the military, which is the backbone of the military dictatorship, so they do something provocative like this. everyone condemns it. chinese will condemn it but they're the only country who can do anything about it because north korea's the most isolated country in the world and china doesn't want it to collapse. though china provides it with energy and food, it's not going to do anything. so obama doesn't have much actionable he could talk about. with regard to iran, they feel as though they've got the pressure on iran. they are watching to see what happens. and i don't think there's going to be much percentage in talking a great deal about situations t
's a surprise to the foreign policy and military people that north korea is a threat and has these nuclear ambitions. i think that president obama actually for many years even going back to the senate and before, was very focused on this issue of nuclear proliferation. and it's the kind of thing that you can talk about in a speech like this, because it isn't only about legislation and what can get passed in the here and now. it's also domestically and in foreign terms kind of what do you want the country to know and what do you want it to do. >> let me ask the difference between doing an inaugural address and the state of the union, you have worked on both of these addresses before. have you ever done both and had to differentiate? i want to know about the mechanics of what it is like for someone like you, to have to craft two extraordinarily important speeches that are heard on a world stage and do they have alternating missions? >> they do a bit have alternating missions, obviously an inaugural address is more formal. it's outdoors. it speaks in some ways to grander themes and longer tim
for foreign policy magazine. he'se1 written twox$$(jjju about iraq and he just wrote this -- work with congress and work with the militarye1 to reshape the military to make it relevant fore1qi) t hagel appears to lack thefá intellectual appetiteÑiq to doñrñr the latter. those are verye1 strong words. gr+zu think chuck haggel has been the pentagon? >> my information is evene1q thoughxd i'm a conservative republic to give the president who ist( nnt his -- politically i don't agree with much of anythingqçó in a john g!i +t5ye1. >> i'm forzúditing the pentagon. i think there is ways for it to be found.xd i know you a solee1yme1i] they may have provided financing and i think he needs to reveal that. i'mñ" one that says, yes, iu- need more information about making aá.", final decision. >> do you thinkxd john mccain can filibuster --p, he is in his project in the the the -- the only way to get the information is toe1 threat them to ai] high standard of with he's- essentially sayingteák hat you would very to qme. we do signature strikes now. we don't even
will be back home by this time yex neanext year. it is a big foreign policy to be made, it's expected to be largely about economic issues and the middle class. >> what do you think, is it going to be partisan or more of an olive branch? >> i don't think it will be either, if i can be so bold as to take something that you're not offering a choice that you're not offering. >> you may take it as always. >> i think he will be assertive. i think he will not perceive, he and the white house will not perceive what he's saying as overtly confrontational. i'm sure it will be interpreted that way. i don't anticipate a big olive branch of a speech. he'll talk about common sense measures republicans have supported in the past and stlu as bipartisan. >> the agenda on immigration, gun control, climate by definition, pre-stage conflict with republicans who are ambivalent at best about moving forward on anything. on the other hand, on the big issue of the debt and deficit, since the summer of 2011 he has signaled that he is willing to make a big deal, including some elements, maybe less than two year
very well. that's about him. but do they like the president's foreign policy? no. so these things kind of blend but generally you could say that for national security republicans, these two nominees, brennan on drones, for example, the use of drones, these nominees become proxies for policies they either question or they don't like. >> and moving forward, we're moving into this second term and the kind of makeup of congress is relatively speaking the same. how much do you think this will impact this hold on nominees, impact the relationship between republicans and democrats? it it can't get much worse. >> the white house isn't happy over hagel. they believe it's petty to hold him up when they believe he's going to eventually get confirmed. so they are not happy about it. republicans need to work with the white house on issues like immigration, for example, will this make for bad blood? yes. will it hold up immigration reform if it's in the interest of both parties to do it, probably not. i think the person who gets affected by this, quite honestly, is chuck hagel himself because he's g
is the president going to say. we've just learned what his big foreign policy announcement is going to be, jake tapper just broke that the president will announce on afghanistan that u.s. troops will be reduced by half by february of 2014, the number of u.s. troops in afghanistan will go down to 34,000, that's specificity we didn't have before and we expect him to detail tonight. carol, by and large the president will be focusing a lot on domestic priorities, specifically the economy. >> mr. speaker, the president of the united states. >> reporter: how times have changed. when he addressed congress one year ago, president obama faced sagging poll numbers and a tough road to re-election. the result? a state of the union address that contained few new proposals and largely fell flat, not likely this year. >> his party gained seats in both the senate and the house. the american people broadly speaking are with him and so he can deliver a speech without the kinds of political constraints that he faced just 12 months ago. >> reporter: white house officials tell cnn that tonight's address will book e
will not make new policy, but, rather, advocate for existing positions. he's going to spend less time on foreign policy than on the economy but that's always the case in his state of the union speeches. on those fronts, expect him to address the drawdown in afghanistan, the u.s. relationship with china and also announce the start of a u.s./european union trade negotiation. big picture, wolf, it sounds like when it comes to republicans, he'll sort of have a club in one hand and olive branch in the other. >> it sounds like he's going to be emphasizing many of the themes he emphasized in the inaugural address. how will this one substantively be a whole lot different? >> his aides say to me that one was the philosophical statement of his beliefs. this one puts molcy meat on the bones. i'm told he will also talk about gay rights, women's rights and climate change. the big difference from the inaugural is the president views tomorrow night as his big opportunity to speak to the american people about the stakes in those across the board budget cuts looming at the end of the month and make his economic
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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